An analysis of atticus and scout in to kill a mockingbird by harper lee

In the story, Scout functions as both questioner and observer. Scout asks tough questions, certainly questions that aren't "politically correct," but she can ask these questions because she is a child.

An analysis of atticus and scout in to kill a mockingbird by harper lee

The narrator of the book is Scout Jean Louise Finch, who is discussing childhood events with her adult brother, Jem, as the story begins. In the first half of the novel, Scout and Jem, along with their childhood companion, Dill, are fascinated by their mysterious neighbor, Boo Arthur Radley.

Because no one has seen Boo in many years, the youngsters construct a gothic stereotype of him, imagining him as huge and ugly, a monster who dines on raw squirrels, sports a jagged scar, and has rotten yellowing teeth and bulging eyes. The second half of the book is principally concerned with the trial of Tom Robinson, a young African American unfairly accused of raping a white woman.

Racial tensions in the neighborhood explode; Scout and Jem are shocked to find that not only their peers but also adults they have known their whole lives are harshly critical of their father, Atticus, who provides the legal defense for the innocent man.

Throughout both sections of To Kill a Mockingbird Lee skillfully shows other divisions among people and how these barriers are threatened.

Obviously, it is not a matter of race alone that sets societal patterns in their provincial Alabama town. Furthermore, as Jem tells Scout later, there is a strict caste system in Maycomb, with each group threatened by any possible abridgements of the social order.

They are country folk who pay their bills with crops and adamantly refuse all charity. At the lowest rung of the social ladder are African Americans, although many are clearly superior to some of the poor white trash, who have only their skin color as their badge of superiority.

They are represented by Tom Robinson, the accused rapist, and Calpurnia, the housekeeper for the motherless Finch family. In addition to the clearly defined social castes, there are deviants, such as Dolphus Raymond, a white man involved in a long relationship with a black woman.

Henry Lafayette Dubose, a member of the upper class who became a morphine addict, whose one desire is to overcome her habit before her death. Also featured is Miss Maudie, the friendly neighbor who seems to represent, along with Atticus, the best hope for change in the community.

Lee uses many symbols in the book, none more pervasive than the mockingbird of the title. The bird is characterized as an innocent singer who lives only to give pleasure to others. Early in the novel, when Atticus gives Jem and Scout air rifles, he makes it clear that it would be a sin to harm a mockingbird, a theme reiterated by Miss Maudie.

Two of the main characters are subtly equated with the birds: Unlike his sister, he is a nonconformist, an atypical southerner, a thoughtful, bookish man at odds with his environment. He constantly tells his children that they can understand other people only by walking in their shoes.

This is foreshadowed early in the novel when Atticus finds it necessary to shoot a rabid dog. However, later, when he faces the mob from Old Sarum, who are intent on lynching Tom Robinson, he simply sits in front of the jail, ostensibly reading a newspaper.

After Scout recognizes Mr. Cunningham and mentions Walter, his son, as her school friend, the group leaves. Tried before a jury of white men, in an echo of the Scottsboro Nine case, which convicted nine innocent black men of raping two white women, Tom Robinson is found guilty in spite of proof that he could not have committed the crime.

However, even here there is a bit of hope for change to come, because the jury does not reach a quick decision, deliberating for three hours in a case involving the strongest taboo in the South, a black man sexually molesting a white woman. Although Lee set her novel in a very isolated locale, which she calls Maycomb, in an era when her notion of crossing racial and social boundaries does not always seem imminently attainable, the world ofwhen To Kill a Mockingbird appeared, was radically different.

The Civil Rights movement had begun: Board of Education decision, and there had been a successful bus boycott in Montgomery, Alabama, inwhich brought activist Martin Luther King, Jr. Finally, people who believed in the importance of applying law fairly and breaking racial boundaries as Atticus Finch did were being heard.

There was some criticism of the melodramatic ending of the novel, in which Bob Ewell attacks the Finch children, who are in costume returning from a school Halloween pageant.

However, in addition to providing closure for the plot, Lee uses this ending to confirm her view of Atticus and his moral character. When he tells Scout that Mr.Home › American Literature › Analysis of Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird.

Analysis of Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird By Nasrullah Mambrol on June 10, • (1) Early in the novel, when Atticus gives Jem and Scout air rifles, he makes it clear that it would be a sin to harm a mockingbird, a theme reiterated by Miss Maudie.

Scout Finch is the protagonist and narrator of To Kill a Mockingbird, and the events of the story unfold through her recollections of growing up in . To Kill a Mockingbird is a Pulitzer-Prize-winning novel written by Harper Lee and originally published in The book is widely regarded as an American classic and, until .

Essay Analysis Of ' Kill A Mockingbird ' By Harper Lee took place. The novel To Kill a Mockingbird takes place in the midst of the Depression, in a fictional small town called Maycomb, Alabama, and tells the story of the fictional family of the Finches.

Mar 16,  · To Kill a Mockingbird chapter summary in under five minutes! Harper Lee's classic novel of modern American literature is one of the most taught books about hero Atticus Finch deals with race.

An analysis of atticus and scout in to kill a mockingbird by harper lee

Rhetorical Analysis of Speeches in to Kill a Mockingbird, Battle of Falkirk, and Brave Heart and Prejudice In the book To Kill a Mockingbird Atticus tells Jem and Scout to shoot at tins cans in the backyard. Analysis of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee is a story of national magnitude that.

To Kill a Mockingbird: Atticus Finch | Character Analysis | Study Guide | Lit Note | CliffsNotes